Skip to main content

Nice, But Not That Nice

Starting with a shockingly obvious statement, I like nice things. I love things that are well made, beautiful, unusual, classic, bespoke and all those things. I'm just not all that bothered about having them for myself, it's enough just to know they exist and people get enjoyment from them. 

I'm a Basic Bish, no debate about that.

There have been a couple of things recently that have just been too expensive and I'm just not prepared to spend/waste my money on them. My new bathroom started me down this road. When we had the bathroom refitted in our old house we spent a lot of money on it and I did like it, and I don't regret it but now I am in the camp of form following function. This time round we've gone plain, it's so plain, I very much doubt it could be less exciting and that's what I like about it. 

A couple of years ago we watched an old film of the architect who designed our house, he was most upset looking at an estate he designed where people had painted the garage doors a different colour. His point was that there was no reason to draw attention to the garage door, it's hardly a feature of the house. It made me laugh out loud, which as I was in a library didn't go down well. but he's right, do I really want to use my garage door as a way to make a statement about who I am? I'm applying that spirit to the house, what do I want to draw attention to and where does it just not matter. 

We've ordered a new front door. We fancied a composite door, a bit fancy and gorgeous, but you know what I don't want it that much to spend more than we paid for the new garage and porch roof. So we're going for the less exciting but just as functional UPVC, exciting it is not, but it will keep unwanted visitors and the weather outside. 

This weekend I went to buy tea. I know prices are going up in general (is anyone keeping a Brexit cupboard?) it had gone up £1 in about 6 week. A whole pound. I bought it this time but said to Dan I have to draw the line when I can get something for half the price that's almost as nice. Most things have a tipping point don't they. I'm Basic but content with my niche.

I'm getting used to saying I can't afford it, it doesn't mean I don't have the money, it just means value is as important to me as anything else. 

Life begins at the end of your comfort zone 

Yeah. 

Comments

  1. I love that phrase Life begins at the end of your comfort zone. We are all different and to me that is what makes the world go round. I am happy to be frugal and save on as much as I possibly can to enable me to be indulgent when we go away on our holidays. I would spend less on a front door so that I could have a trip away. I too am happy to say I can't afford it.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I often say ' I like it, but I don't like it x pounds worth'. I have a flinch point for everything, though when I tried on the most perfect coat this morning that had been reduced from £100 to £50 I rather wished I didn't. Even though I know I would get a lot of wear from it, £50 is a huge amount when I usually buy my coats from charity shops!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree with you, I often need Dan to give me a push to buy something from a "real shop" as my views are so skewed from working at the charity shop. I did pay £50 for a rain coat last year, it was reduced in the White Stuff sale, it has been worth the money though.

      Delete
  3. I'm with you on the camp of nice, but nice enough will do me. That is a huge increase in a short time on tea.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I think we reach a point where our own 'style' comes to the fore and not anyone else's which does not mean we don't appreciate the style of others just that we are more comfortable with things around us that we like.
    xx

    ReplyDelete
  5. “I can’t afford it” is a common saying of mine too. Some things I probably could afford but try to make every penny I earn count. I don’t earn even a quarter of what I used to. I don’t know what I think about Brexit. I’m hoping prices will stabilise after a while. Maybe I should be thinking of gathering a few essentials together.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're right, it's not just a matter of having the money, it's about getting the best value for that money.

      It will be interesting to see what happens with food prices, like you say it will probably only be a short term thing is there is any fluctuation.

      Delete
  6. I live with an architect - he gets upset too! When he has designed a beautiful public space after adhering well to the brief and endless consultations with the client and then they go and stick notices up everywhere with sellotape on the walls and doors or fill the space up with rubbish and dead plants on the window sills.
    I would always go for one beautiful piece even if expensive than a lot of cheap. Prices are becomming out of control now and we haven't even left the EU yet - wait until we have no one who wants to pick our fruit and veg and we end up buying it from abroad - I think we could be held to ransom - can't wait!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There's a really nicely done,recently renovated hotel on the prom with nice sliding glass door, completely ruined by large "warning, this is a glass door" stickers on each pane. It annoys me every time I pass by!

      I am interested to see what will happen with fruit and veg picking this year, fingers crossed that prices don't continue to rise.

      Delete
  7. We're the same. We could have spent £40k on a new kitchen to add to the value of the house, but why would we want to. Whoever moves in after us at whatever point in the future will only rip it out and start again most likely anyway.

    It's just as well that I'm of a similar mind set to you, as we do get some very nice items at the CS and I'd be way too tempted if I was at all impressed by designer things. I'd much rather go unnoticed than be spotted wearing £500 shoes or carrying a £1000 bag. More chance of being mugged if you ask me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly. We are doing things to this house for us, I can guarantee if someone else moved here (I have no plans to move) they'd undo a lot of the things we've done. We removed the bath as I never have a bath, a family moving in would probably replace my walk in shower, but that's not my concern!

      Good point about being mugged or having your bag pinched, a thief would snatch it without giving you a second thought.

      Delete
  8. White suites for us these days and ring the changes with nice towels.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I quite agree. There are so many things we can afford, but really sometimes function does win out over fancy.

    God bless.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't want to be afraid to use my things either, something right at the top of my budget might become something I didn't want to damage which is just daft!

      Delete
  10. I love this blog post and agree 'what do I want to draw attention to and where does it just not matter'. I have never been one to keep up with 'the Joneses' either. Your right about prices going up, I noticed something recently but cannot remember what it was. I am not keeping a Brexit cupboard, but I think I will may have to think about some essentials.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you.

      I think a stock of essentials is a good idea. I had a memory pop up on Facebook today, it's a year since I came down with flu, having plenty in the pantry made things so much easier.

      Delete

Post a Comment