Monday, 22 June 2015

Eating With My Eyes

I've always said that I'm not bothered about food, and given a free choice I'd never eat again. I also get overly dramatic about how much of a fuss and faff cooking it. But I'm coming round to it, through a slightly wonky route. 

We've been trying a few things people have recommended to us, and it's been interesting. We don't usually eat a huge amount of convenience food but we have been recently. It's a good thing and a not so good thing. The not soo good is that it's pretty expensive and often not all that nice, the good thing is that I can take the idea and come up with a version that is more to our liking. 

The other thing is that we've been going to quite a few co-operatives and health food shops. Strangely I've been quite inspired by seeing all the dried food and an excited again about turning this cheap, brown food into something exciting. The other good thing about shops like this is that it's obvious that everyone else there is excited about buying this stuff and turning it all into something, rather than buying stuff that's already something and just eating it. The super freshness of the veg is a big draw, still so full of vitamins and flavour, it made me think about our little veg patch and how it seems mundane, but it's not really, it's exciting - you can't get fresher than really fresh can you? And my leeks (if they grow) will have cost me about 50p for two dozen. It's starting to seem weird that I'd see something as "better" because it's not mine. 

An extra boost was our trip to Unicorn in Chorlton on Saturday, I was very interested by their deli section. There was an amazing selection of fried goods, I don't make them myself, other than onion bhajis, but I could find and follow a recipe. There were some curries and a fantastic looking dhal, I know my dhal is delicious and I make a lot of things from my Indian cookbook - maybe it's not all that authentic, but it's really tasty. Then there were the salads, they looked amazing, so I looked at them to see what made them so amazing - I liked the look of the ones with sprouted seeds, I don't do that but I think sprouting seeds was the first science experiment I ever did at infant school when I was about six years old, so how hard can that be? The rest of the veg looked so wonderful because it looked different to my salads. The main difference seems to be using a spiraliser or some nice chopping, but in terms of ingredients there was nothing out of my reach or capabilities. 

I may be slow at catching up with slow food, but I could just be getting there. 

I didn't buy anything, and I loved Unicorn even though I kept my money in my purse. 

10 comments:

  1. I'm finding myself on a similar journey at the moment and quite enjoying where it is taking me. Not sure everyone else in the household is quite so happy about it, but I'm sure they'll come round when they reap the benefits of better health.

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    1. Glad you're enjoying the discoveries. I'm kind of working backwards and rediscovering the joy of fresh and healthy things. What the past few months has revealed is how much less healthy our (my) eating habits are these days, compared to six or seven years ago. Although our waistlines should have been a warning sign!

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    2. I forgot to say in my comment, but the vegetables you grow yourself are so much better than those you can buy, because you know exactly what hasn't been sprayed on them. The things I grow are often nothing special, but knowing how they've been grown does make a difference to me anyway..

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    3. I know what you mean, we had a lot of success with our onions last year and they were amazing, and very convenient! We don't spray our veg with anything, I don't even kill slugs, it just is what it is.

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  2. I am finding your thoughts on food very interesting as I have recently gone plant based...it is such hard work but I feel so much better in the month I've been eating vegan.
    Plus we're juicing as well to get extra vitamins in.


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    1. Thanks, it is hard work to transition to a plant based diet, but I'm glad you're feeling the benefit already. My brother is a massive fan of juicing, he is in great shape, so it certainly suits him.

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  3. I love sprouting chickpeas and mung beans and other seeds- they are crunchy and delicious- hmmm, you've reminded me, I should do that- I have loads of mung beans in the cupboard! I love whole food shops, we saw so many in Totnes and we bought some nice bits to stock up on. Glad you are finding some things to inspire you! Mmmm, I love Dhal.One of the Indian TAs bought in a massive box of left-over dhal to share and I ate loads.x

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    1. Oooh, lucky you, leftovers!

      We have to travel for good whole food shops but as I mentioned the other week we love Single Step in Lancaster, which is within easy reach. Visiting the other places recently has really given me a big boost.

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  4. I had a sprouting jar but can't find it now. I did do sprouting but lack the room to put the jar in a place that I will remember to rinse the sprouts.

    I never plan meals, I'm either too lazy or undisciplined, I buy stuff in and decide on the spur of the moment. I do a lot of making up meals of what I can find.

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    1. I think this has been my only worry with a sprouting jar, having somewhere out of the way, but not so out of the way I will forget about it!

      I do make up a lot of meals to use up bits and bobs, but without a menu plan I'd bee looking at what we have in and not be able to think of a thing to have. It's just how my brain works, if I decide I don't want what's on the plan reacting against it throws up an idea of what I can use the ingredients for instead.

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